Tips & Articles

7
July
2017

The Bats of Tolmer Falls

The sprawling plains of Darwin and beyond promise visitors an eclectic mix of scenery, from Red Desert landscapes to cascading waterfalls and vast scrubland. If you’re in the area, there’s plenty of wildlife to spot and stunning scenery to soak up. At Tolmer Falls, one of the best-loved waterfalls and natural wonders in the region, there is a lot to see and do. Here, an incredible lookout point juts over the tumbling water that drops into a deep, refreshing plunge pool at the base. Around the edge, there is a picturesque walking track that takes you right up to the […]

   
  
26
June
2017

The Wildlife of the Litchfield National Park

Litchfield National Park is located around 100km from Darwin in the Northern Territory of Australia. The expansive area covers more than 1,500 square kilometres and has retained its national park status since 1986. It was named after Frederick Henry Litchfield, a keen explorer who travelled much of the Northern Territory back in the mid-1800s. The region has been inhabited by Aboriginal tribes for thousands of years, and the plants and animals that call the area home remain important parts of the park for many different reasons. The Plant Life of the Litchfield National Park At the heart of the park, […]

   
  
7
June
2017

Exploring Litchfield National Park

Found just to the south of Darwin, Litchfield National Park sprawls out in a picturesque display of cascading waterfalls, crystal clear swimming holes, and intriguing termite mounds. Amongst it all, there are some incredibly historical sites and stunning natural scenery, like the impressive sandstone Tabletop Range, and the lush greenery of monsoon rainforests. There are plenty of things to get stuck into while you’re in the park, regardless of whether you’re looking to enjoy the wildlife, the stunning views, or more adventurous pursuits. Things to Do in Litchfield National Park Go for a Swim There are numerous spring-fed waterfalls that […]

   
  
5
May
2017

Wading Birds and Wetlands at the Fogg Dam Conservation Reserve

Set around 70 kilometres east of bustling Darwin, the Fogg Dam Conservation Reserve unfolds into one of the very few wetlands systems in Australia that can be accessed by visitors all year round. A selection of educational boardwalks take you on a trail through a range of different landscapes, stopping off a picturesque observation platforms along the way where you can marvel at the stunning views and spot the selection of resident wading birds. The birdlife at the Fogg Dam Conservation Reserve is second to none and is really the biggest draw to the area. To experience it at its […]

   
  
18
April
2017

How to Experience the Darwin Botanical Gardens

Located just two kilometres outside the bustling centre of Darwin, the George Brown Darwin Botanic Gardens promise 42 hectares of tropical plant species for you to explore and admire. Having been a part of Darwin for more than 130 years, the gardens host a range of ancient species, including a huge canopy of rain trees and tall palms. You can combine a visit to the gardens with a trip to the Mindil Beach Sunset Markets during the dry season for the ultimate cultural and picturesque experience. What’s more, this is one of the only botanic gardens in the world that […]

   
  
29
March
2017

How to Explore Wangi Falls

Set amongst the stunning scenery of the Litchfield National Park near Darwin, Wangi Falls promises visitors a magical dose of beauty and fascinating history. It is perhaps the best-known and best-loved attraction in the park, and can be reached by a sealed road to the west of the park – 150km to the south of bustling Darwin. Around the falls, there is plenty for visitors to get stuck into, including hiking, relaxing, and wildlife spotting. Around the base, you can kick back and relax in the manicured picnic area as you watch the cascading water fall down the rocks and […]

   
  
3
March
2017

The History and Stories of Stokes Hill Wharf

Set on Darwin’s picturesque waterfront, the Stokes Hill Wharf acts as both a vital part of the city’s history and a popular tourist attraction bursting with al fresco restaurants, waterside bars, and shops. Once the site of the city’s prominent pearling industry and the tragic Bombing of Darwin, the area is now a great place to learn key stories about Darwin and unwind as the sun sets over the pretty views. The History of the Wharf In 1885, the Railway Jetty was built in the place the Stokes Hill Wharf now resides. It was smaller in size and was built […]

   
  
21
February
2017

The Feeding and Breeding Habits of Australian Saltwater Crocodiles

Crocodiles are one of Australia’s most iconic creatures, and Saltwater crocs are one of the most common varieties. These huge, prehistoric creatures are dangerous and territorial, but they are also incredibly impressive and beautiful. Found mostly across the north of Australia in places like Darwin and its surroundings, the name saltwater crocodile is actually a little misleading. These creatures can be found in the brackish waters along the country’s coastlines, but can also be found in freshwater rivers, swamps, and billabongs that are set miles away from the sea. Australian saltwater crocs take the title of largest reptile in the […]

   
  
3
February
2017

Fun Facts About Kakadu National Park

The Kakadu National Park is one of Australia’s oldest and most mesmerising landscapes, and is set just outside of Darwin. Here, time seems to stand still; ancient Aboriginal tribes still live a traditional life, while the plant life and animal life has been living in the area for thousands and thousands of years. Today, the park is a World Heritage listed site, thanks to both its incredible scenery and its living Aboriginal culture. Ready to learn more about Kakadu? Fun Facts About Kakadu National Park It’s BIG The park covers almost 20,000 square kilometres, making it the largest national park […]

   
  
19
January
2017

The Adelaide River and its Saltwater Crocs

The Adelaide River weaves its way around Darwin, creating the perfect habitat for a number of Australia’s native creatures. It begins in the sprawling expanse of the Litchfield National Park and flows north towards Clarence Strait. Along the way, it picks up eight tributaries before depositing into its mouth in the sheltered confines of Adam Bay in the Timor Sea. Along the river’s length and in the surrounding landscapes, there are plenty of species of animal and plant to discover, while the incredible landscape promises breath-taking views and ancient scenery. The river itself was named in memory of Queen Adelaide […]

   
  
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