Can you swim in Darwin?

We know the bustling city of Darwin for its hot climate, thick bushland, and rich biodiversity. The city is right next door to the Aussie ocean, giving guests a hot summer beach vibe amidst the buildings and bush. However, there is a rumour out there that states that they allow no swimming at Darwin. Whoever came up with this was dead wrong, as the city is filled with swimming spots for all to enjoy. However, some of the watering holes and ocean shores can be dangerous for visitors, so read our list of how to avoid these risks while swimming.

The threats you may face    

Crocodiles

The most dangerous locals of Darwin are the Saltwater Crocodile. These massive reptiles are very strong, sneaky, and sprint through the water, sneaking up on their prey easily. Unfortunately for us, we fall under the category of prey for these creatures, so making sure you stay at a safe distance from these animals is crucial. Throughout history, many tourists and locals have been attacked by crocs in Darwin, with a large amount losing their lives. Crocodiles can roam in lakes, rivers, and at beaches, ready and waiting for their next unexpecting meal.

Jellyfish

During the stinger season, Darwin’s beaches are swarming with poisonous jellyfish. Box Jellyfish are most common jellyfish around, typically found in the shallow waters of the coast. The average size of the jellyfish is around 38 centimetres long, with their tentacles extending up to a whopping 3 meters. Once stung by one, a person will receive agonisingly painful whip-like marks. There isn’t usually a fixed date for the stinger season, but it does occur typically from November to May.

How to avoid

For crocs, avoiding the spots where they roam is your only option. Darwin has very strict guidelines for crocodiles, with large warning signs for known croc waters, as well as information brochures shown to tourists frequently. Once you know the swimming spots are croc-free, you can go ahead and enjoy the waters!

For jellyfish, you can either avoid the jellyfish prone areas or use protection to harm you from their stings. Jellyfish wetsuits are available, and nets can be used to prevent jellyfish to enter areas as well.

Which spots you can swim

Patrolled Beaches

Seeing the renowned red and yellow flags on the beach is a clear sign that the area is safe. Professional lifesavers patrol the waves and will sound an alarm if there is any sign of risk.

Safe Swimming Spots

Looking up the safe swimming spots whether they be waterfalls, rivers, or lakes, is an essential activity. With numerous signs, brochures, and advice from locals, visitors can enjoy a full day in the sun and water without the worry of any danger.

Join our Darwin City Tours & Surrounds now!

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